One Word Photo Challenge – Beige

One Word Photo Challenge – Beige

beige color challenge

 

This week’s color for the One Word Photo Challenge is Beige. I’ve gone ahead and chosen one of my images from the Grand Valley Orchid Society 2015 Show, this will be the first of many so stay tuned. (Some I will post in Orchid posts others I may continue to share in photo challenges.)

 

This may be a bit of a loose representation however Beige seems a bit like Indigo in that there are numerous interpretations. The image I’ve chosen to enter into this is that of Clowesetum (Clo.) Justine Herrera. This is a genus of Orchid I do not have, in fact I have no plants of Catasetum, Clowesia or Clowesetum in my personal collection. This particular hybrid is between Clowesia Rebecca’s Daughter and Catasetum spitzii according to the Royal Horicultural Society’s registration of this hybrid. Catasetum spitzii is a species, meaning it’s naturally occurring in the wild; whereas Clowesia Rebecca’s Daughter is a hybrid of the genus Clowesia. Thus Clowesetum is the name given to represent this cross between Catasetum and Clowesia.

 

Catasetums are quite a diverse even unusual genus of Orchids. Most, if not all, are deciduous and lose their leaves in their dormant period. While dormant, or starting from when the leaves begin to yellow, it is advised that you stop watering. According to Orchid Flower HQ if the pseudobulbs begin to shrivel quite severely it is okay to water them some. They can tolerate a range of light however near the end of their growth period they should be given stronger light according to The American Orchid Society’s care sheet. They also like a lot of water especially when preparing for the dormant season. They prefer intermediate to warm temperatures. To learn more about these rather interesting plants follow the provided links or do some searching of your own. Also click here for Google images showing the vast diversity of this genus, who knows you may get hooked!

 

Clowesia is basically a cousin of Catasetum. That is they are part of the same sub-tribe as Catasetums: Catasetinae. Other genera in this sub-tribe are Cynoches, Dressleria & Mormodes. I do believe – again I don’t have any of these so I’m gathering my information online – that these should be treated much the same as the Catasetums in terms of culture. However with that said something to remember about Orchids is that they’re incredibly diverse. So typically care sheets provideย general care instructions but most orchids will benefit from doing further research into their more specific conditions as they all exist along a range, some are going to be on one end; others, the other. While you may keep them alive and growing your particular plant could produce better and more flowers, perhaps even more often, if you provide itsย ideal conditions. It is this challenge that keeps so many people interested in collecting and growing orchids, managing to keep them so well and so happy that they become specimen plants and put on incredible floral displays. (I’m shooting for this.)

 

P.S. It is my goal to provide a little more very extremely generalย information about various Orchids I post, and especially to provide at least a few links for you to follow to get the real dirt on the various plants. Don’t follow what little I put here alone, I’m just providing something quick for you to consider. ๐Ÿ˜‰

 

So finally here is Clowesetum (Clo.) Justine Herrera:

 

Clowesetum (Clo.) Justine Herrera from the Grand Valley Orchid Society 2015 Show

Clowesetum (Clo.) Justine Herrera from the Grand Valley Orchid Society 2015 Show

11 Comments

  1. Midwestern Plant Girl

    These are very beautiful and surely beige! I enjoy reading about the different types of orchids. They are so fascinating and I really don’t know a whole lot about them. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    1. eLPy13 (Post author)

      Thank you very much. You’re right, they are fascinating. The never-ending variety of Orchids has hooked me. I had no idea when I searched around online to get help with the few Phalaenopsis I had received and was killing (turns out I was under-watering). Once I started to research them, partake in OrchidBoard, and really pay attention I understood why it’s such a hobby. Now these days it’s best you don’t engage me in an Orchid conversation unless you’re interested or an addict yourself. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Thanks as always for visiting. I’ll get you some sparkly pics soon. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Reply
  2. Jennifer Nichole Wells

    This is beautiful! Love all the info you’ve included. While this particular plant does look like an orchid, I’m so used to seeing larger orchids that I wouldn’t have thought that right off the bat.

    Reply
    1. eLPy13 (Post author)

      Thank you all around. ๐Ÿ™‚ I’d bet you’re used to seeing Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchids). There are tens of thousands of different orchids and they vary tremendously. In fact there are also micro-miniatures, and some whose flowers don’t look much like what you think when you hear “flower”.

      Cheers, thanks for commenting.

      Reply
      1. Jennifer Nichole Wells

        micro-miniature orchids sound like my kind of plant! ๐Ÿ™‚ I looked up moth orchids and those are definitely the main thing I picture when thinking of orchids. Thanks for the info!

        Reply
        1. eLPy13 (Post author)

          Absolutely, glad I could help!! And too those you see in the stores, sometimes with tons of big flowers, are representation that they’ve been fed and watered quite well and given the perfect temps and light (though they’re often forced to bloom in order to sell). It takes some skill I’m learning to achieve those kinds and numbers of blooms. It’s a nice challenge.

          You know I had several micro-minis then I killed two of them. ๐Ÿ™ But I still have one! I forgot to water it while it was in spike last summer so it “blasted” which means it dried up and died. Fortunately the plant is growing another growth which should flower when it matures and I will share. They do remind me of your images for sure! A lot of people keep terrariums of micro-minis. ๐Ÿ™‚

          Reply
          1. Jennifer Nichole Wells

            micro mini terrarium sounds pretty cool. I have a few plants, but constantly forget about them and thus don’t water them- so I keep my collection to a minimum.
            I’ve heard orchids can be very difficult to grow and tend to depending on the variety. I work with a man who has quite a collection of them and tells me about his on occasion, or the rare ones he sees at shows.

            Reply
            1. eLPy13 (Post author)

              Actually Orchids are not nearly as fragile as an overall family as people say they are. Of course there are those that require more than less but most of them are really very resilient. In fact you’re better off under-watering them than over-watering since that will cause their roots to rot. It’s extremely important that their roots can “breathe”, and again some more than others.

              So you’d probably be really surprised how easy they can be. Once you get the hang of the plants you have it’s smooth sailing. The challenges come in when you want to get bigger and better plants and blooms. Some, like myself, like this. That’s when you look into the plants natural history and where its parents live in the wild. I could go on and I won’t but my main point is that they’re really not so difficult. I didn’t water a bunch of mine for 6 weeks and they all survived though they did suffer some. Ask him and I’m sure he’ll tell you they’re pretty hardy.

              Reply
              1. Jennifer Nichole Wells

                hmm, well that makes them seem a lot less daunting. I’m very good at under-watering ๐Ÿ™‚ And knowing their history seems like a good idea.

                Reply
                1. eLPy13 (Post author)

                  There you have it! You could be an enthusiast in the making. ๐Ÿ˜‰

                  Reply
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